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Indonesia - Contents
©Lonely Planet Publications Pty Ltd
Go further with Lonely Planet
“ All you’ve got to do is decide to go and the hardest part is over. So go!”
TONY WHEELER, COFOUNDER – LONELY PLANET
PAGE
2
PLAN
YOUR TRIP
Photos, itineraries, lists and suggestions
2
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Indonesia’s numbers
astound: 17,000 islands
(or is it 20,000?), of which
8000 are inhabited (or is
it 11,000?), 300 languages
spoken (or is it 400?). Yet it’s
all one country with myriad
adventures.
Welcome to
Indonesia
Talk to other
travellers
Looking for ideas and advice on a
specific destination? Want to share
your experiences with the most active
travel community? Then head to Thorn
Tree, Lonely Planet’s forum, where
you’ll find new posts every 12 seconds.
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online booking service.
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2
4
6
16
18
20
22
26
40
Book activities
Discover and book amazing experiences
online for destinations around the globe.
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Rich Diversity
The world’s fourth most populace country –
245 million and counting – is a sultry
kaleidoscope that runs along the equator
for 5000km. It may well be the last great
adventure on Earth. From the western tip
of Sumatra to the eastern edge of Papua is
a nation that deÀes homogenisation. It is a
land of so many cultures, peoples, animals,
customs, plants, features, artworks and
foods that it is like 100 (or is it 200?) countries melded into one. And we’re talking
di՗erences that aren’t just about an accent
or a preference for goat over pork; we are
talking about people who are as radically
di՗erent from each other as if they came
from di՗erent continents. No man may be
18
NIELS VAN GIJN/GETTY IMAGES ©
Welcome to Indonesia ...
Map ..................................
20 Top Experiences .......
Need to Know .................
If You Like ........................
Month by Month .............
Itineraries ........................
Outdoor Adventures ......
Regions at a Glance .......
1
YOUR PLANNING TOOL KIT
an island but here every island is a unique
blend of the men, women and children
who live upon it. Over time deep and rich
cultures have evolved, from the mysteries
of the spiritual Balinese to the utterly nonWestern belief system of the Asmat people
of Papua.
Beaches & Volcanoes
Venturing through the islands of Indonesia you’ll see a land as diverse and unusual
as those living upon it. Look at Sulawesi on
a map and you’ll save yourself the cost of a
Rorschach test at a shrink. Or view Sumatra from the air and be humbled by a legion
of nearly 100 volcanoes marching o՗ into
the distance, several capable of blowing at
3
lonelyplanet.com/apps
Check out our full range of guides
Travelling somewhere
somewhe
ere else? Staying
Stay
ying longer in a particular
yin
particula place? Check out our full range of
guides, writ
tten and researched by
b expert authors to give
e you an amazing travel
t
written
experience.
Madura
for serious adventure and exploration. Java
he country historically, culturally and economically.
aluku comprise hundreds of islands from everk to the relative isolation of the Banda Islands.
, Bali figures large for visitors, drawing half of
s always, your biggest consideration will be
your visa.
#
Bali
Nusa Tenggara
Culture 333
Nightlife 333
Surfing 333
Surfing 333
Diving 33
Culture 33
The rich culture of Bali is
matched by its myriad attractions for visitors: excellent dining and nightlife,
hundreds of good places to
stay, famous beaches, epic
surfing, alluring shopping
and a gracious welcome.
Whether you’re here for
waves, or to dive deep
underwater or into local
culture, Nusa Tenggara offers gifts unmatched. From
Lombok to Timor you will
be tempted, blessed, satiated and leave hungry for
more.
p197
January
February
M
The first part of the
month is busy on Bali as a
fair bit of Australia arrives
for Christmas and New
Years holidays. Europeans
searching for warmth
arrive in large numbers.
It’s dry season in the east.
This is a good time to hit
dive and snorkel sites
in Maluku and Papua,
where the waters will be
especially clear.
A
I
f
T
o
w
z Garebeg
Nusa Tenggara’s biggest festival: vividly dressed
teams of horsemen engage
in mock, though sometimes
bloody, battles in West Sumba. Often coincides with
Nyale on Lombok, a huge
fishing festival celebrated by
th S k
Java’s three most
colourful festivals are held
annually in Yogyakarta at
the end of January and
April and the beginning of
November. Huge numbers
of people in traditional
d
hi
i
z Pasola
H
J
t
j
c
(
2
COUNTRY
COUNT
COUN
T
TRY
&R
REGIONAL
RE
REG
GIONAL
GION
G
AL
Th ffreedom
The
d
you need
d to
t
plan the perfect trip.
4
UNDERSTAND
697 INDONESIA
PAGE
EBOOKS
The same great content
with added interactivity.
shop.lonelyplanet.com/ebooks
Discover a world of travel
Fire the imagination of younger travellers and get inspired to see even more of the world.
GET MORE FROM YOUR TRIP
Learn about the big picture, so you
can make sense of what you see
belief systems
if Indonesia were
100 people
(% of population)
mi rants and invaders, rebels and religions, kingdoms and em
oreogra hed by Indonesia’s island nature and its location on
a-old Asian trade routes. It’s a story full of heroes and villains
nd victims, but the strangest part is how these 17,000-plus is
th their 739 languages and diverse cultures ever came to be a
t all
Trading Archipelago
ans inhabit a diverse island world where a short sea voyage or
nland can take a traveller into a whole new ecosystem providing
nt set of useful commodities. Long ago forest dwellers were cololourful bird feathers and tree resins and exchanging them for
60,000–
40,000 BC
About
8000 BC
Indonesia’s western
islands are still connected to the Asian
mainland. The Àrst
Homo sapiens arrive,
probably ancestors
of the Melanesians in
today’s population,
who are now found
mainly in Papua.
Sea levels rise after
the end of the last glacial period, separating
Sumatra, Borneo,
Java and Bali from
the Asian mainland,
and the island of New
Guinea from Australia.
A
200
Austronesia
origina
Taiwan start
in Indonesia,
by sea rou
absorb or
Melanesians.
est evidence
ments dates
6th cen
86.1
8.7
Muslim
Christian
1.8
3.4
Hindu
Other
41 would be Javanese
15 would be Sundanese
3 would be Maderanese
41 would be other
groups dedicated to reversing the so far relatively successful Indo
xperiment in modest secularism.
lthough memories of bombings earlier in the decade in Bali a
arta have faded significantly, there are regular reminders of se
oncerns. There were hotel bombings in Jakarta in 2009 and in
ISBN 978-1-74179-845-6
9 781741 798456
indonesia-10-cover.indd 2
POCKET
POCK
ET
Perfect for
a quick visit.
shop.lonelyplanet.com
p298
Indonesia Today ............. 698
History ............................. 701
Culture............................. 720
Environment ................... 737
Food & Drink ................... 745
SHOESTRING
S
SHOESTRI
HOESTRING
NG
Big trips
Bi
t i on
small budgets.
TRAVEL BOOKS
Inspirational travel photography
and amazing ways to discover
even more of the world.
NOT-FOR-PARENTS
Our Not-For-Parents series
is made for children who are
curious about the world.
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LONELY PLANET TRAVELLER
Go online to subscribe to this
award-winning magazine made
for anyone who loves to travel.
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53399
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against the Forest Stewardship
Council™ standards. FSC™ promotes
environmentally responsible, socially
beneficial and economically viable
management of the world’s forests.
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newsletter
24/01/2013 11:30:17 AM
PAGE
42
ON THE
ROAD
Sumatra
p485
YOUR COMPLETE DESTINATION GUIDE
In-depth reviews, detailed listings
and insider tips
Kalimantan
p583
Java
p44
Bali
p197
SURVIVAL
755 GUIDE
PAGE
Directory A–Z ................. 756
Transport ........................ 768
Health .............................. 776
Language ........................ 781
Index ................................ 792
Map Legend .................... 814
Sulawesi
p633
Maluku
p401
Papua
p444
Nusa Tenggara
p298
VITAL PRACTICAL INFORMATION TO
HELP YOU HAVE A SMOOTH TRIP
cas
ment.) S
to call back (
to a centre in yo
country where an
assessment of your
Health
Treatment for minor injuries
and common traveller’s
health problems is easily
accessed in larger cities and
on Bali but standards decline
the more remote you get in
Indonesia. For serious conditions, you will need to leave
Indonesia.
Travellers tend to worry
about contracting infectious diseases when in the
tropics, but infections are a
rare cause of serious illness
or death in travellers. Preexisting medical conditions,
ch as heart disease, and
dental injury (especially
accidents) account for
-threatening probming ill in some
is relatively
s you may
verex-
Recommended
Vaccinations
Specialised travel-medicine
clinics are your best source
of information; they stock all
available vaccines and will
be able to give specific recommendations for you and
Most vaccines don’t
produce immunity until
at least two weeks after
they’re given. Ask your
doctor for an International
Certificate of Vaccination
(otherwise known as the yellow booklet), which will list
all the vaccinations you’ve
The World Health Organ
zation’s vaccination reco
mendations for Southe
Asia include the follow
Adult diphtheria
Single
recommende
the previo
effect
THIS EDITION WRITTEN AND RESEARCHED BY
Ryan Ver Berkmoes
Brett Atkinson, Celeste Brash, Stuart Butler, John Noble,
Adam Skolnick, Iain Stewart, Paul Stiles
Every listing is recommended by our authors, and their
favourite places are listed first
Look out for these icons:
Our author’s top
recommendation
JAVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
JAKARTA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
THOUSAND ISLANDS . . . . . 70
WEST JAVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Gunung Krakatau . . . . . . . . .74
Ujung Kulon National Park. .75
Bogor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Cimaja . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82
Gede Pangrango
National Park . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Bandung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Pangandaran . . . . . . . . . . . . .95
Cirebon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
CENTRAL JAVA . . . . . . . . . . 104
Wonosobo . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106
Dieng Plateau . . . . . . . . . . .107
Borobudur . . . . . . . . . . . . . .109
Yogyakarta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Gunung Merapi . . . . . . . . . .129
Prambanan . . . . . . . . . . . . .132
Solo (Surakarta). . . . . . . . .135
Gunung Lawu . . . . . . . . . . .142
NORTH COAST . . . . . . . . . . 145
Semarang . . . . . . . . . . . . . .145
Bandungan . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Kudus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152
Jepara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .154
Karimunjawa Islands . . . . .156
EAST JAVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
Surabaya . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .158
Pulau Madura . . . . . . . . . . . 167
Malang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Panataran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Gunung Bromo &
Bromo-Tengger-Semeru
National Park . . . . . . . . . . .184
A green or
sustainable option
Ijen Plateau . . . . . . . . . . . . .188
Alas Purwo
National Park . . . . . . . . . . . .192
Baluran National Park . . . .195
BALI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
SOUTH BALI . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
Kuta & Legian . . . . . . . . . . 207
Seminyak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .218
Bukit Peninsula. . . . . . . . . 226
Sanur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232
Denpasar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .237
NUSA LEMBONGAN &
ISLANDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241
UBUD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246
AROUND UBUD . . . . . . . . .260
Bedulu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260
Tampaksiring. . . . . . . . . . . .261
EAST BALI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 262
Gianyar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264
Pura Besakih . . . . . . . . . . . 266
Gunung Agung . . . . . . . . . .267
Padangbai . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269
Candidasa . . . . . . . . . . . . . .272
Amlapura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .274
Tirta Gangga . . . . . . . . . . . .275
Tulamben . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .278
CENTRAL MOUNTAINS . . . 279
Gunung Batur . . . . . . . . . . 280
Danau Bratan . . . . . . . . . . 283
NORTH BALI . . . . . . . . . . . . 286
Lovina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288
WEST BALI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Tanah Lot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293
Bali Barat
National Park . . . . . . . . . . . 296
No payment
required
NUSA TENGGARA. . .298
LOMBOK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .300
Mataram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302
Senggigi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307
Gili Islands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 311
Gunung Rinjani . . . . . . . . . .327
Tetebatu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329
SUMBAWA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 336
KOMODO & RINCA
ISLANDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 345
FLORES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .348
Labuanbajo . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
Manggarai Country . . . . . .357
Bajawa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358
Riung . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .361
Kelimutu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 365
Moni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 366
Maumere . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367
ALOR ARCHIPELAGO. . . . . 371
Kalabahi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 371
WEST TIMOR . . . . . . . . . . . . 374
Kupang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .375
Soe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 380
Kefamenanu . . . . . . . . . . . 382
ROTE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .384
Nemberala . . . . . . . . . . . . . 385
SUMBA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387
Waingapu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 389
Waikabubak . . . . . . . . . . . . 393
MALUKU. . . . . . . . . . .401
NORTH MALUKU . . . . . . . .403
Pulau Ternate . . . . . . . . . . 404
Pulau Tidore . . . . . . . . . . . . 411
See the Index for a full list of destinations covered in this book.
On the Road
Pulau Halmahera . . . . . . . .413
PULAU AMBON . . . . . . . . . . 416
Kota Ambon . . . . . . . . . . . .418
LEASE ISLANDS . . . . . . . . . 425
PULAU SERAM . . . . . . . . . . 427
BANDA ISLANDS . . . . . . . .429
Bandaneira . . . . . . . . . . . . .431
Pulau Ai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 436
KEI ISLANDS . . . . . . . . . . . .438
Tual & Langgur . . . . . . . . . 438
Pulau Kei Kecil . . . . . . . . . 439
PAPUA . . . . . . . . . . . 444
WEST PAPUA . . . . . . . . . . . .450
Sorong . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 450
Raja Ampat Islands . . . . . 452
Manokwari . . . . . . . . . . . . . 457
THE NORTH. . . . . . . . . . . . .460
Jayapura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 460
Sentani . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 464
Pulau Biak . . . . . . . . . . . . . 467
BALIEM VALLEY . . . . . . . . . 472
Wamena . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .472
THE SOUTH . . . . . . . . . . . . .482
Wasur National Park . . . . 483
Asmat Region . . . . . . . . . . 483
Korowai Region . . . . . . . . . 484
SUMATRA . . . . . . . . 485
NORTH SUMATRA . . . . . . .489
Medan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 490
Bukit Lawang . . . . . . . . . . 495
Berastagi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Danau Toba . . . . . . . . . . . . 504
PULAU NIAS . . . . . . . . . . . . 511
Pantai Sorake &
Teluk Lagundri . . . . . . . . . .515
ACEH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 517
Banda Aceh . . . . . . . . . . . . .519
Pulau Weh . . . . . . . . . . . . . 523
Banyak Islands . . . . . . . . . .527
Gayo Highlands . . . . . . . . 529
Gunung Leuser
National Park . . . . . . . . . . 530
WEST SUMATRA . . . . . . . . . 533
Padang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 533
Mentawai Islands . . . . . . . 540
Bukittinggi . . . . . . . . . . . . . 545
Danau Maninjau . . . . . . . . 553
Kerinci Valley. . . . . . . . . . . 556
BENGKULU . . . . . . . . . . . . .560
RIAU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562
Pekanbaru . . . . . . . . . . . . . 562
Pulau Bintan . . . . . . . . . . . 566
JAMBI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 568
SOUTH SUMATRA . . . . . . . 572
Palembang . . . . . . . . . . . . .572
Krui . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .574
LAMPUNG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 575
Way Kambas
National Park . . . . . . . . . . .579
KALIMANTAN . . . . . .583
EAST KALIMANTAN . . . . . . 588
Balikpapan. . . . . . . . . . . . . 588
Samarinda . . . . . . . . . . . . . 593
Sungai Mahakam . . . . . . . 596
The Muller Mountains . . . 603
Wehea Forest . . . . . . . . . . 605
Derawan Archipelago. . . . 607
NORTH KALIMANTAN . . . . 610
WEST KALIMANTAN . . . . . 610
Pontianak. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .610
Sungai Kapuas . . . . . . . . . . 617
CENTRAL KALIMANTAN . . 619
Tanjung Puting
National Park . . . . . . . . . . .619
Palangka Raya . . . . . . . . . 624
SOUTH KALIMANTAN . . . . 627
SULAWESI . . . . . . . . .633
SOUTH SULAWESI . . . . . . .636
Makassar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 637
Pantai Bira . . . . . . . . . . . . . 644
TANA TORAJA . . . . . . . . . . .649
Rantepao . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .651
Makale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 657
WEST SULAWESI . . . . . . . .662
Mamasa Valley . . . . . . . . . 662
CENTRAL SULAWESI . . . . . 665
Lore Lindu
National Park . . . . . . . . . . 668
Togean Islands . . . . . . . . . .672
NORTH SULAWESI . . . . . . . 676
Gorontalo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .677
Pulau Bunaken . . . . . . . . . 683
Tomohon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 687
Pulau Lembeh &
the Lembeh Strait . . . . . . 688
Tangkoko-Batuangas Dua
Saudara Nature Reserve . . . 689
SOUTHEAST SULAWESI . .690
Bau Bau . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 693
Tukangbesi Islands . . . . . 694
› Indonesia
Indonesia
ANDAMAN
SEA
THAILAND
MYANMAR
(BURMA)
110ºE
BANGKOK
95ºE
CAMBODIA
100ºE
Gunung Leuser National Park
The definition of
steamy jungle (p530)
SOUTH
CHINA
SEA
VIETNAM
PHNOM PENH
HO CHI MINH CITY
(Saigon)
Gulf of
Thailand
Cross-Borneo Trek
A world-class
adventure (p587)
Tanjung Puting
Get close to some
orangutans (p619)
Banda
Aceh
PENINSULAR
MALAYSIA
Bukit Lawang
Medan
Kota Kinabalu
Selat
Malaka
BANDAR SERI
BEGAWAN
SARAWAK
KUALA
LUMPUR
Pulau
Nias
SINGAPORE
Equator
Pekanbaru
SUMATRA
Padang
Pulau
Siberut
Pontianak
Mentawai
Islands
Pulau
Enggano
Palembang
KALIMANTAN
Samarinda
Palangkaraya Balikpapan
Pangkalanbun
Tanjung Puting
Pulau National Park
Belitung
Bandarlampung
Serang
Bogor
Jakarta
The capital parties
24/7 (p65)
Borobudur
One of the wonders
of the world (p109)
Sintang
Pulau
Bangka
Pangkal Pinang
Bengkulu
EAST
MALAYSIA
Kuching
Riau
Islands
Jambi
Loksado
Selat
Makassar
Banjarmasin
JAVA SEA
JAKARTA
Bandung
JAVA
Semarang
Borobudur
Cilacap
Yogyakarta
Solo
Candi
Sukuh
Pulau
Madura
Surabaya
Malang
BALI
Denpasar
Christmas Is
(Australia)
Candi Sukuh
Enigmatic 15th-century
temple (p142)
INDIAN
OCEAN
SABAH
BRUNEI
Danau
Toba
Pulau
Simeulue
115ºE
LAOS
Lombok
Mataram
Pulau
Sumbawa
Bukit Beaches
Bali's funky and hidden
sandy gems (p227)
Gili Islands
Three fun-filled
idylls (p311)
Top Experiences
Experiences ›
130ºE
Tana Toraja
Wild spectacles open
to visitors (p649)
MANILA
135ºE
140ºE
15ºN
125ºE
ELEVATION
PACIFIC
OCEAN
4000m
PHILIPPINES
120ºE
2000m
1000m
500m
10ºN
0m
Pulau Bunaken
An easy yet remote
escape (p683)
0
0
500 km
250 miles
SULU
SEA
PALAU
Pulau Ternate
Tropical dreams that
are real (p404)
5ºN
Raja Ampat Islands
Stunning, remote fish-filled
diving (p452)
SULAWESI
SEA
Manado
Gorontalo
SULAWESI
Palu
Kota Ternate
MALUKU
S E A Bacan
Islands
Rantepao
Makale
Kendari
Watampone
Makassar
Manokwari
Sorong
Pulau
Biak
Kota Biak
Sarmi
Kota Ambon
Jayapura
PAPUA
Fak-Fak
MALUKU
Wamena
Banda
Islands
5ºS
Timika
BANDA
SEA
FLORES SEA
Pulau
Wetar
NUSA TENGGARA Flores
DILI
Ende
SAWU SEA
Pulau
Sumba
Equator
S E R A M Pulau
S E A Seram
Sula
Islands
Majene
Pulau
Halmahera
Kupang
Pulau
Timor
Tanimbar
Islands
EAST
TIMOR
Banda Islands
Indonesia's most beautiful
archipelago? (p429)
TIMOR
SEA
Darwin
Pulau
Yos Sudarso
10ºS
ARAFURA
SEA
Baliem Valley
Home to the unique
Dani people (p472)
15ºS
Komodo National Park
Famous lizards that
look like dragons (p348)
Gulf of
Carpentaria
AUSTRALIA
OUR STORY
A beat-up old car, a few dollars in the pocket and a sense of
adventure. In 1972 that’s all Tony and Maureen Wheeler needed
for the trip of a lifetime – across Europe and Asia overland to
Australia. It took several months, and at the end – broke but
inspired – they sat at their kitchen table writing and stapling
together their first travel guide, Across Asia on the Cheap.
Within a week they’d sold 1500 copies. Lonely Planet was born.
Today, Lonely Planet has offices in Melbourne, London,
Oakland and Delhi, with more than 600 staff and writers. We share Tony’s belief that ‘a great
guidebook should do three things: inform, educate and amuse’.
OUR WRITERS
Ryan Ver Berkmoes
Coordinating Author, Bali Ryan Ver Berkmoes first visited Indonesia in 1993. On
his visits since, he has criss-crossed the archipelago, trying to make a dent in
those 17,000 islands. Recent thrills included finally reaching the amazing Banda
Islands after 18 years of trying and finding the perfect flat on Bali. Off-island,
Ryan travels the world writing. Read more at ryanverberkmoes.com and on
Twitter @ryanvb.
Brett Atkinson
Sumatra After sampling spicy nasi Padang on previous Indonesian journeys
from Bali to Flores, finally experiencing the cuisine in its West Sumatran heartland didn’t disappoint. Other Sumatran adventures included exploring the
remote Mentawai Islands by speedboat, and chilling out in the beautiful Harau
Valley. Brett’s based in Auckland, New Zealand, and has covered more than 45
countries as a guidebook author and travel and food writer. See www.brett-atkin
son.net for what he’s been eating recently, and where he’s travelling to next.
Celeste Brash
Sulawesi Celeste first visited Indonesia in 1995 after concentrating in Southeast
Asian studies at the University of California. Even with the earthquakes, volcanoes and terrible bus rides, the country seduced her and she’s since spent many
months exploring, from Sumatra to Bali and up through Sulawesi. She currently
lives in Portland, Oregon and has contributed to over 40 Lonely Planet titles. Find
out more about her at www.celestebrash.com.
Stuart Butler
Sumatra Stuart Butler first hit the shores of Indonesia many years ago at the end
of a long trans-Asia surf trip. Not surprisingly it was the highlight of his trip. Today
Stuart lives with his wife and son on the beautiful beaches of southwest France.
His travels for Lonely Planet and a variety of international surf magazines have
taken him across Indonesia and beyond, from the desert beaches of Yemen to the
coastal jungles of the Congo. His website is www.stuartbutlerjournalist.com.
OVER MORE
PAGE WRITERS
Published by Lonely Planet Publications Pty Ltd
ABN 36 005 607 983
Although the authors and Lonely Planet have taken all reason10th edition – May 2013
able care in preparing this book, we make no warranty about
ISBN 978 1 74179 845 6
the accuracy or completeness of its content and, to the maximum extent permitted, disclaim all liability arising from its use.
© Lonely Planet 2013 Photographs © as indicated 2013
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Printed in Singapore
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mechanical, recording or otherwise, except brief extracts for the purpose of review, and no part of this publication may be sold or hired, without the
written permission of the publisher. Lonely Planet and the Lonely Planet logo are trademarks of Lonely Planet and are registered in the US Patent
and Trademark Office and in other countries. Lonely Planet does not allow its name or logo to be appropriated by commercial establishments, such
as retailers, restaurants or hotels. Please let us know of any misuses: lonelyplanet.com/ip.
John Noble
Papua John has been entranced by Indonesia – its multifarious cultures, translucent seas, jungle-fringed sands, lumbering dragons, exhibitionist birds of paradise, above all the fact that every single island is a different world – ever since his
first visit during the Suharto era. He has devoted recent trips to remote, restive,
untamed Papua, a piece that doesn’t really fit the jigsaw, which despite (or because of) its contradictions is probably the most exciting region of all.
Read more about John at:
lonelyplanet.com/members/ewoodrover
Adam Skolnick
Maluku, Nusa Tenggara Adam Skolnick writes about travel, culture, health and
politics for Lonely Planet, Outside, Men’s Health and Travel & Leisure. He has coauthored 18 Lonely Planet guidebooks to destinations in Europe, the US, Central
America and Asia. His 11-week research trip to Nusa Tenggara and Maluku included stops on 37 islands. He hired, hopped or hitched 21 planes, 45 cars, five bemo,
12 buses, 25 motorbikes, 32 boats, six horse carts, one bicycle and one becak.
You can read more of his work at www.adamskolnick.com or find him on Twitter @adamskolnick.
Iain Stewart
Java Iain’s been travelling in Indonesia since 1992, journeying between West
Sumatra and East Nusa Tenggara in search of wildlife in national parks and the
highlife in Jakarta and Bali. He’s covered Indonesia seven times for various Lonely Planet guides. He authors books about Vietnam, Central America and Spain
and writes for newspapers including the Independent, Guardian, Telegraph and
Times. He’s a keen scuba diver, free diver, hiker and, when circumstances allow,
a weekend warrior (or is that hacker?) on the tennis court of Brighton, UK. Highlights of Iain’s trip
across Java were hanging out with the Cianjur crew, hiking in Baluran, motorbiking around Batu
Karas, munching in Semarang and hooking up with co-author Adam in Gili T.
Paul Stiles
Kalimantan Paul specialises in islands, ecotourism, and adventure travel for
Lonely Planet, so Kalimantan was a natural. For this book he completed the entire Cross-Borneo Trek, crossing the Muller Range in five days. His only regret is
that he did not have his camera when a rare clouded leopard swam right in front
of his boat. Guide: ‘I don’t know, looks like a wild cat…Oh my god, macan dahan!’
Read more about Paul at:
lonelyplanet.com/members/paulwstiles
22
Itineraries
Whether you’ve got 6 days or
60, these itineraries provide a
starting point for a fantastic
Indonesian trip. Want more
inspiration? Head online to
lonelyplanet.com/thorntree to
chat with other travellers.
Bali
Sea
É
Ubud •
#
Seminyak•
#
•
#
É
É
É
BALI
Gili
Islands
Gunung
•
# Kawai
Padangbai
•
#
É
LOMBOK
#
Senggigi •
•
# Mataram
É
É
É
#
Munduk •
É
•
# Lembar
•
#
INDIAN
OCEAN
Bukit
Peninsula
14 to 21 Days
Bali & Lombok
Start in Bali, where you can acclimatise in the resorts, clubs and shops of Seminyak.
Dose up on sun at the beach, then go exploring the perfect little beaches and surf
breaks down the Bukit Peninsula.
Head north to immerse yourself in the ‘other’ Bali – the culture, temples and rich
history of Ubud. Visit the Unesco-nominated Gunung Kawi, an ancient site worthy of
Indiana Jones, and the nearby craft villages. Take a cooking course or learn batik, woodcarving or silversmithing. Once you’ve exhausted your yen for culture, escape to the misty
mountains for treks to waterfalls amid coffee plantations in and around Munduk.
Next on the agenda is Lombok. Take a ferry from Bali’s beachy port town of Padangbai to
Lembar, Lombok’s launching pad. Potter through the rice fields and Hindu temples around
Mataram, then head to Senggigi for indulgent resorts, fine beaches and uninterrupted R&R.
From Senggigi take a ferry to the deservedly celebrated Gili Islands, where seamless
beaches, translucent water and vivid reefs beg for snorkel-clad swimmers. Or if you’re short
on time, just catch a fast boat direct to the Gilis from Bali.
23
THAILAND
Pulau Weh Marine
÷ National Park
#
Bukit
Lawang
É
•
#
É
•
# Medan
•
# Berastagi
SOUTH
CHINA
SEA
BRUNEI
MALAYSIA
É
SINGAPORE
Harau
•
# Valley
#
Bukittinggi •
•
# Danau
Maninjau
INDIAN
OCEAN
É
#
Mentawai •
Islands
Sumatra
Java Jaunt
÷
Bukit Barisan Selaton #
National Park
Way Kambas
É
J A VA S E A
÷ National Park
#
É
‚
_ JAKARTA Prambanan Bromo-Tengger#
Borobodur
•
# •
#•
# É
•
# Solo
# •
Pangandaran •
#
‚
Batu
Karas
Yogyakarta
Semeru
National
Park Meru Betiri
÷ National Park
#
÷
#
÷
Alas Purwo National Park #
14 to 30 Days
30 to 60 Days
Java Jaunt
Sumatra
Start your journey in Jakarta and
wrap your senses around the dizzying smells, sounds, sights and people
of Indonesia’s teeming capital. Linger
long enough to binge on Bintang beer and
shopping, then head to Batu Karas for classic laid-back beach vibes or go for the resorts
of nearby Pangandaran.
After you’ve worshipped the sun for a
week or so, catch the train to Yogyakarta,
Java’s cultural capital. Dabble in batik, amble
through the kraton (walled city palace) and
part with your rupiah at the vibrant markets.
A day trip to majestic Borobudur is a must.
The longer you look, truly the more you’ll see.
From Yogyakarta make your way to the
laid-back city of Solo, via the enigmatic temples of Prambanan. Head into the clouds
at awesome Bromo-Tengger-Semeru National Park, spending a night on the lip of
Tengger crater. From here head to the southeast coast and Meru Betiri National Park.
You just might see the amazing giant squirrel. Finally follow the coast to Alas Purwo
National Park where there’s leopards and
amazing surfing at G-Land.
Sumatra is quite huge and you’ll have
to hustle to fully appreciate it within
visa constraints. Start your explorations in Medan, which has fab transport connections. Then get right out of town
and head to Bukit Lawang where you can
see the island’s most famous residents, the
orangutans. It’s a short jaunt from here to
Berastagi, a laid-back hill town set amidst
volcanoes.
Travel north to the very tip of Sumatra,
but don’t stop, definitely don’t stop. Sharks,
turtles and other large sea creatures live
amidst splendid coral at Pulau Weh Marine National Park off the coast. Head
back south and travel off the west coast to
Banyak Islands, a surfing and beach paradise. Back ashore, follow the Trans-Sumatra
Highway south to Bukittinggi, a good base
for exploring the cultures and beauty of the
Harau Valley and Danau Maninjau.
There’s more surf, sand and underwater
joy off the coast in the Mentawai Islands.
Finally head far south to Bukit Barisan
Selaton and Way Kambas National
Parks. The former has a few rhinos and
tigers in lowland forests while the latter has
elephants. From here it’s easy to catch the
Java ferry.
PL AN YOUR TRIP I T I N E R A R I E S
MALAYSIA
#
Banyak •
Islands
24
MALAYSIA
CELEBES
SEA
•
#
Pulau
Biak
•
#
É
Jayapura
•
#
•
#
É
Danau
Sentani
•
#
Kei
Islands
É
Pulau
Satonda
•
#
É
#
Baliem •
Valley
•
#
Banda
Islands
#
•
#•
É
Kota Ambon •
#
‚
#
Nabire •
É
É
•
#
‚
PL AN YOUR TRIP I T I N E R A R I E S
Raja Ampat
Islands Sorong
É
Ternate •
#
Komodo
•
#
Sumbawa •
#
Lombok
Sumba
•
# Flores
TIMOR-LESTE
É
•
# Kupang
•
#
Rote
Nusa Tenggara & Maluku
Papua
TIMOR
SEA
AUSTRALIA
ARAFURA
SEA
30 Days
30 to 60 Days
Papua
Nusa Tenggara & Maluku
Papua is the launching pad for this
route, which can be done in 30 days
with judicious use of flights. Start at
the transport hub of Jayapura. But
you’ll only be there long enough to charter a
boat to visit the magnificent Danau Sentani, a 96.5-sq-km lake with 19 islands perfect
for inland island-hopping.
Back on dry land, take to the air to get
to the beautiful Baliem Valley, rich in culture and trek-worthy mountain scenery.
The valley is home to the Dani people, an
ethnic group who have eschewed most modern things and live a traditional life. Enjoy
mountain views from a thatched hut.
Fly to Nabire and spot whale sharks off
the coast – you can even swim with them.
Now fly up for some idle island time on Pulau Biak. Next it’s a flight to Sorong, a base
for trips out to the Raja Ampat Islands – a
paradise for divers and snorkellers with Indonesia’s most abundant and varied marine
life. It’s also good for birdwatchers and sublime tropical-island scenery.
Head east from Lombok. Admire the
beautiful coastline along Sumbawa
and look for hidden corners. Make
your way to Flores, a rugged volcanic
island with fishing villages, thriving culture
and dramatic terrain. Stop off for some communing with dragons at Komodo on the
way. Note that you can also do Lombok to
Flores by liveaboard boat.
Now take ferries south to isolated and
timeless Sumba, where some superb beaches are just starting to attract visitors. Ponder
this at beautiful beaches around Waikabubak, such as Pantai Nihiwatu. After indulging in sun and isolation, fly to Kupang in
West Timor. Visit villages in the surrounding
areas, then jump over to Rote for relaxed
coastal vibes.
Fly from Kupang to Kota Ambon on
Maluku’s Pulau Ambon. Pause only briefly,
then take a ferry (often frustrating) or plane
to the crystalline seas, multicoloured reefs
and empty beaches of the historic Banda
Islands. Make your way back to Ambon and
fly to Ternate, which is as pretty a tropical
island paradise as you’ll find. Finally make
the jaunt east to the Kei Islands, for one
perfect beach after another.
25
•
#Pulau
MALAYSIA
CELEBES
SEA
Bunaken
•
#
•
# Manado
É
Derawan
É
Sungai
Mahakam
É
Palangka
Raya
Pangkalan
Bun
÷
#
•
#
Gorontalo
#
Tana Toraja •
•
#
Banjarmasin
J A VA S E A
•
#
•
# Ampana
Poso •
#
•
# Tentena
Sulawesi
É
Tanjung Puting
National Park
É
É
•
#
Togean
Islands •
#
•
# Samarinda
É
•
#
PL AN YOUR TRIP I T I N E R A R I E S
Kalimantan
(Borneo)
Makassar •
#
É
Kalimantan
Indonesia’s Island Heart
Flores
# •
#
Komodo •
Labuanbajo
TIMOR-LESTE
30 Days
30 to 60 days
Indonesia’s Island Heart
Kalimantan
Start on Flores and take a dragonspotting hike on Komodo. Enjoy
time in the agreeable port town of
Labuanbajo and head off-shore for
some diving. From here, fly to Makassar
on Sulawesi – this may require connecting
someplace.
In Makassar, pause amid the pandemonium for excellent seafood. But don’t overdo
it, as you want to be fully alive for the elaborate funeral ceremonies in Tana Toraja, an
eight-hour bus trip from Makassar. From
here, another long bus ride (13 hours) takes
you to the transport hub of Poso. Break
your journey at the tidy lakeside town of
Tentena. A five-hour bus ride from Poso
gets you to Ampana where you take a ferry
to your reward: the amazing, beautiful and
beguiling Togean Islands. Spend your days
island- and hammock-hopping between
iconic beaches.
Tearing yourself away, take a boat to
Gorontalo, then bus it to Manado and
take a boat to laid-back Pulau Bunaken,
where you can finish out the time on your
visa.
Unassuming Pangkalan Bun is the
entry point to this excursion – it’s the
launching pad for trips into glorious
Tanjung Puting National Park, one
of Indonesia’s best orangutan haunts. Scan
the canopy for their amber bodies from the
top of a houseboat as it ambles down the
beautiful Sungai Kumai.
Rejoin reality in colourful Banjarmasin.
Dabble in Kalimantan’s most beguiling city –
brave a 5am call for the animated floating
markets, then cruise the canals and meet
the locals at dusk. Begin another classic river
adventure by navigating up the Sungai Kahayan to Palangka Raya, a hub for yet more
orangutan watching. Your boat choices range
from the simple to the luxe.
From Banjarmasin, travel overland to
Samarinda and make an expedition along
Sungai Mahakam. Several days upstream
will land you in the river’s western reaches,
which are peppered with semitraditional
Dayak villages and preserved forests. Travel back to the coast and head north to the
offshore underwater wonders of Pulau Derawan. This primitive teardrop-shaped island offers fabulous diving and snorkelling.
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